February 13-2020
AR portraits show the influential women, in motion

A portrait in any form including painting, photograph, sculpture or other artistic format is a representation of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person.

Los Angeles-based animation house, Studio Moshon has redefined the art of portraits by giving it a twist and creating it in AR format. The studio has created AR portraits for Women in Entertainment to connect visitors with previous event speakers including Ava DuVernay, Meredith Walker, Geena Davis, and more. The Women in Entertainment Summit is widely renowned for its collaboration of influential female figures in the entertainment space. 

Each portrait can transform the flat portrait into a living AR experience via Instagram. Powered by artificial intelligence, Studio Moshon’s offering marries cutting edge technology with traditional fine art, creating oil painted portraits celebrating inspirational women in entertainment and sharing their stories through AI and AR technology.

The studio started out making test AR filters, combining the new techniques and technology and were quickly drawn to the concept of interacting with art on display, putting a spin on the traditional art gallery or museum exhibit experience. They had the idea to combine important narratives with the AR technology, leading to the ‘Women in Motion’ exhibit.

Each one of these accomplished women in the portraits has an important message and cause to convey. The portraits highlight issues such as diversity, representation, empowerment and personal discovery and the drive to support your passion. The studio thought that their experiences and outlook will allow viewers to understand issues within the industry and also translate the positive messages into their own lives and help them think about solutions creatively.

Studio Moshon founder Sara Riding said, “The mixture between a traditional medium and interactive technology draws interest from all audiences. The interactive elements are more appealing to younger crowds that grew up with a smartphone in their hand, and the traditional physical artwork draws interest from all who appreciate creativity and traditional mediums.”

The exhibit has received positive responses, with visitors taking home printed versions of the portraits. The innovation and technical aspects are appreciated at technology led festivals and there is ease to focus on the message and the importance of what the speakers are doing at the Women In Entertainment Summit.

The studio will be exhibiting the portraits in SXSW on 14 March 2020 as a finalist in the Interactive Innovation Awards. “We are continuing to share the ‘Women in Motion’ exhibit to conferences and festivals with the mission to empower women in entertainment. We would love to show the activation in India in the future if there’s interest from a festival or gallery space,” added Riding.

Studio Moshon plans to combine traditional animation and illustration with augmented reality in the coming future. One can expect to see some innovative approaches to communicating good causes and messages with the freedom of animation and illustration, along with technology which makes experiencing it novel and sharable.

“Telling stories and developing narratives through animation for socially good projects drives our team, and we will continue to push creativity through these lenses,” Riding concluded.

With this innovative take on the traditional art, Studio Moshon has given a different angle to creating art, combining technology.